Tuesday, December 1, 2015



Barque Kruzenshtern Under Sails  source 


Clipper Cutty Sark Under Sails source 

Cutty Sark is a British clipper ship. Built on the Clyde in 1869 for the Jock Willis Shipping Line, she was one of the last tea clippers to be built and one of the fastest, coming at the end of a long period of design development which halted as sailing ships gave way to steam propulsion.

 Clipper Cutty Sark Model Ship



French Tall Ship Under Sails 


Barque US Coast Guard Eagle Tall Ship

 US Coast Guard Eagle Wooden Ship Model


Royal Clipper Tall Ship source


Flying Cloud Clipper 

Flying Cloud is popularly called an extreme clipper, as are many of Donald McKay's ships, but as her dead rise was less than 40" she was not. Donald McKay built many fast clipper ships but only one, Stag Hound was an extreme clipper, even if others may have been advertised as such. It was popular to advertise clippers as "extreme" because of the popular conception of speed.
Flying Cloud was built in East Boston, Massachusetts in 1851 and intended for Enoch Train of Boston, who paid $50,000 for her construction. While still under construction, she was purchased by Grinnell, Minturn & Co., of New York, for $90,000, which represented a huge profit for Train & Co
 Flying Cloud Wooden Clipper Model Ship


HMS Victory source 

HMS Victory is a 104-gun ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built between 1759 and 1765. She is the oldest naval ship still in commission. She sits in dry dock in Portsmouth as a museum ship.

Construction

In December 1758, the commissioner of Chatham Dockyard was instructed to prepare a dry dock for the construction of a new 106-gun first-rate ship. This was an unusual occurrence at the time; during the whole of the 18th century only ten were constructed—the Royal Navy preferred smaller and more manoeuvrable ships and it was unusual for more than two to be in commission simultaneously.
The outline plans arrived in June 1759 and were based on HMS Royal George which had been launched at Woolwich Dockyard in 1756. The Naval Architect to design the ship was Sir Thomas Slade who, at the time, was the appointed Surveyor of the Navy.
The keel was laid on July 23, 1759 in the Old Single Dock (since renamed No. 2 Dock and now Victory Dock), and the name was finally chosen in October 1760. It was to commemorate the Annus Mirabilis or Year of Victories, of 1759. In that year of the Seven Years' War, land victories had been won at Quebec, Minden and naval battles had been won at Lagos and Quiberon Bay. There were some doubts whether this was a suitable name since the previous first-rate Victory had been lost with all on board in 1744.

 HMS Victory Ship Model Replica



Sailing Image by Gary Felton 


Tall Ship Under Sails 


Tall Ship Sedov 

The STS Sedov (RussianСедов), formerly the Magdalene Vinnen II (1921–1936) and the Kommodore Johnsen (–1948), is a 4-masted steel barque that for almost 80 years was the largest traditional sailing ship in operation. Originally built as a German cargo ship, the Sedov is today a sail training vessel, training cadets from the universities of MurmanskSaint Petersburg and Arkhangelsk. She participates regularly in the big maritime international events as a privileged host and has also been a regular participant in The Tall Ships' Races.


USS Constitution Old Ironsides 218 Years Old Vessel photo source 

At the end of the American Revolution, in 1783, the United States began to send ships across the globe in an effort to bolster its fledgling economy. By 1785 the Continental Navy of the Revolution had been dissolved, leading to these ships sailing unprotected in international waters, a move which eventually lead to the creation of the USS Constitution. During this time, off of the coast of Northern Africa, merchant ships were in need of naval protection leading Congress to authorize a new navy in 1794. As part of this "new navy" six frigates were ordered, the last remaining of which is the legendary USS Constitution. On March 27, 1794 the Naval Armament Act was passed and an order was placed with Edmund Hartt's Shipyard for the ship, costing just over $300,000. On November 1, 1794 the Constitution was laid down, and she was launched on October 21, 1797. Emerging as a ferocious, heavily armed vessel, the USS Constitution was on her way to becoming the legend she is today.

 USS Constitution Model Ship

 USS Constitution Old Ironsides Model Ship  (1:82 scale)


Sailing Ship source 


HMS Bounty Replica, Built in 1960

Bounty was originally known as collier Bethia, built in 1784 at the Blaydes shipyard in Kingston upon HullEast Yorkshire, England. The vessel was purchased by the Royal Navy for £1,950 on 23 May 1787, refit, and renamed Bounty.[2] The ship was relatively small at 215 tons, but had three masts and was full-rigged. After conversion for the breadfruit expedition, she was equipped with four 4-pounder (1.8 kg) cannons and ten swivel guns source 


 HMS Bounty Wooden Tall Ship Model
HMS Wooden Bounty Tall Ship Model 



Tall Ship Under Red Sails source 



 HMS Endeavour Tall Ship 


In 1768 Lieutenant James Cook, Royal Navy, set sail on HMS Endeavour on a voyage of exploration and scientific investigation and through his journeys, Cook is considered to be one of the greatest explorers.
In 1770 Cook reached New Zealand where he circumnavigated and completely charted the north and south islands before continuing west. In April, he sighted the east coast of Australia and sailed north along the coast before anchoring in what he named Botany Bay. He then continued north to Cape York and on to Jakarta andIndonesia. During the four months voyage along the coast Cook charted the coastline from Victoria to Queenslandand proclaimed the eastern part of the continent for Great Britain.
Cook was the first person to accurately chart a substantial part of the coastline of Australia and to fix the continent in relation to known waters. His explorations of Australia were followed up within a few years by a British expedition to settle the "new" continent. Accordingly, Cook is considered a major figure in Australia's modern history. Numerous places in Australia, particularly on the east Australian coast and New Zealand, have been named after him or his vessel, and many of the names he gave to parts of the Australian east coast in 1770 are still used (e.g. Cape Tribulation, Botany Bay, the Whitsunday’s).

Cook's 1768-1771 voyages in HMS Endeavour is also considered to be of general historical importance because of its great contributions to the world's knowledge of seamanship and navigation, as well as geography. On his voyages Cook became the first captain to calculate his longitudinal position with accuracy, using a complex mathematical formula developed in the 1760's. He was also the first to substantially reduce scurvy among his crew, a serious, sometimes fatal result of dietary deficiency on long voyages




Baltimore Clipper source 

 Baltimore Clipper

The Baltimore Clipper is one of the best known sailing vessels in existence today, with its rakish silhouette distinctive from a distance. The Baltimore Clipper has been involved in privateering, piracy, smuggling, slave trading, and there are a number of modernized Clippers sailing today on both coasts of America.

Originally known as a Virginia-built boat, the fast and lean craft that was built at Fells Point and other locations evolved over time, emphasizing speed, weatherly sailing abilities, and handling over everything else. A Baltimore Clipper type can best be defined by extremely tall and raking masts, very little rigging, low freeboard, great rake at both the stem and stern, with the keel featuring a great amount of drag from front to rear. A Baltimore Clipper features a great deal of deadrise, and slack bilges. They had a decent amount of beam for their length and were flush-decked for easy handling of guns and sails.


25th April, 1936. ‘Herzogin Cecilie’ hits rocks in the fog at Salcombe in Devon. The windjammer, the largest sailing ship in the world, was famous as the winner of several grain races from Australia to England. As all hope of saving the ship was abandoned, the crew were rescued by the Salcombe Life Boat source 


Bluenose Schooner Under Sails source 

Bluenose was launched at Lunenburg, Nova Scotia on March 26, 1921, as both a working cod-fishing schooner and a racing ship. This was in response to a Nova Scotian ship's defeat in a race for working schooners established by the Halifax Herald newspaper in 1920. After a season fishing on the Grand Banks, Bluenose defeated the ship Elsie from Gloucester, Massachusetts, returning the trophy to Nova Scotia. During the next 17 years of racing no challenger, American or Canadian, could wrest the trophy from her.



 Wooden Model Ship Star of India

Star of India was built in 1863 as Euterpe, a full-rigged iron windjammer ship in Ramsey, Isle of Man. After a full career sailing from Great Britain to India then to New Zealand, she became a salmon hauler on the Alaska then to California route. After retirement in 1926, she was restored between 1962 and 1963 and is now a seaworthy museum ship ported at the San Diego Maritime Museum in San Diego, United States. She is the oldest ship that still sails regularly and the oldest iron hulled merchant ship still floating. The ship is both a California and United States National Historic Landmark.



Learning About Sailing Ships source


Star of India docked in San Diego source wikipedia 

 SS Gaelic Wooden Model Ship Replica


The SS Gaelic was built by Harland & Wolff of Belfast, Northern Ireland, for the White Star Line and weighed 4,206 tons. The maiden voyage was on February 28, 1885, and the ship made Pacific crossings for the Occidental & Oriental Steamship Co., from 1885 to 1904. The passage of 102 Korean immigrants to Hawaii began on December 29, 1902 in Nagasaki, Japan, and ended on January 13, 1903, when the ship arrived in Honolulu. The Gaelic was refitted by Harland & Wolff in 1905 and sold to the Pacific Steam Navigation Co. in the same year and renamed Callao, but was retired and broken up in 1907.



Barque Under Sails source wikipedia 


In the 18th century, the British Royal Navy used the term bark for a nondescript vessel that did not fit any of its usual categories. Thus, when the British Admiralty purchased a collier for use by James Cook in his journey of exploration, she was registered as HM Bark Endeavour to distinguish her from another Endeavour, a sloop already in service at the time. She happened to be a ship-rigged sailing vessel with a plain bluff bow and a full stern with windows.
William Falconer's Dictionary of the Marine defined "bark", as "A general name given to small ships: it is however peculiarly appropriated by seamen to those which carry three masts without a mizzen topsail. Our Northern Mariners, who are trained in the coal-trade, apply this distinction to a broad-sterned ship, which carries no ornamental figure on the stem or prow."

The UK's National Archives states[citation needed] that there is a paper document surviving from the 16th century in the Cheshire and Chester Archives and Local Studies Service, which notes the names of Robert Ratclyfe, owner of the bark "Sunday" and 10 Mariners appointed to serve under Rt. Hon. the Earl of Sussex, Lord Deputy of Ireland.


At the helm 



Tall Ship Sailing 



Tall Ship Stormy Sea source