Friday, September 25, 2015

 San Felipe Ship Model


    The San Felipe was one of the most beautiful Spanish ships in the 1600s. Launched in 1690, it had 96 cannons and was the the lead ship of the feared Spanish Armada. It was powerful enough to go up against the most formidable ships in the French and British navies. In 1705, the San Felipe and 11 other Spanish ships waged a a furious and heroic battle against 35 British ships. After 24 hours of fighting, the San Felipe was captured, but was so badly damaged that it could not be salvaged as a prize. It sank with several tons of gold.

 Bluenose 2 Schooner Model
    Canadian Schooner Bluenose 2 Model Ship 
      Generations of Atlantic Canadians have grown up with stories of the Original Bluenose Nova Scotia, her Captain Angus Walters and Bluenose II.
      The vessel became the world's most famous Nova Scotian fishing schooner racing victorious - and undefeated - into history and legends.
      A glorious reign as Queen of the North Atlantic began with her launching from Lunenburg's Smith and Rhuland boatyard on March 26, 1921. It tragically ended a quarter century later.
      In 1963, Bluenose II was launched from the same shipyard, built by many of the men who had worked on the Original Bluenose.

      Interesting Bluenose II facts

      • Home port: Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
         
      • Bluenose II is acknowledged to have the largest working mainsail in the world. It measures 4,150 square feet (386 m2). The total sail area measures over 11,000 square feet (1036 m2) and is 43.5 m (143 feet) in length.
         
      • All crew members live onboard during the ship's six-month season.
         
      • In 1971, the Oland family of Halifax sold Bluenose II to the government of Nova Scotia for $1.
         
      • Since 1937, the image of Original Bluenose has graced the Canadian dime (10 cent piece).
         
      • In 1995, Original Bluenose and her captain, Angus Walters, were inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
         
      • Nova Scotia's Bluenose II and the Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic is proudly operated by the Lunenburg Marine Museum Society.
 1628 Batavia Ship


The Batavia was built in Amsterdam in 1628 and was armed with 24 cast-iron cannons. She was a ship of the Dutch East India Company and had a crew of 341 men. The Batavia was shipwrecked on her maiden voyage, and made famous by the subsequent mutiny and massacre that took place among the survivors. In 1970, the Batavia wreck and many artifacts were salvaged, including the stern of the ship. Some of the items, including human remains, which were excavated, are now on display in the Western Australian Maritime Museum in Fremantle, Australia.

   Cape Cod® Wind Speed Indicator with "Peak Gust" Upgrade
  Cape Cod® Wind Speed Indicator with "Peak Gust" Upgrade


 Xebec Boat Model


The three masted Xebec was used for centuries in the Mediterranean as a merchant ship because of its speed and shallow draught. It was not long before Corsairs, the pirates of the Mediterranean, decided on the Xebec as their vessel of choice for lightening fast attacks on heavier merchant ships. With its fourteen cannons slug low in the waists, the Xebec would hole her prey just inches above the waterline making escape impossible. Six culverins were mounted along the poop deck for close action or just in case the crew tried to mutiny. Oars were used when the wind failed giving the Xebec the upper hand in attacking other vessels or fleeing the authorities.

 Whaling Ship Model Charles W. Morgan Barque


In the 1840s, a Quaker whaling merchant named Charles W. Morgan ordered a whaleship from the shipbuilders Jethro and Zachariah Hillman of New Bedford, Massachusetts.
The hull and deck of Morgan reflected the industry which she was built to serve. A typical whaleship has three functions:to serve as a mother ship to a fleet of small whaleboats, which are stored on the davits when not in use,to serve as a factory and a refinery ship with tryworks for extracting oil from the whale blubber, to serve as oil tankers.
Morgan's maiden voyage began on September 6, 1841. She sailed around Cape Horn and cruised the Pacific Ocean. Following Morgan's three year and four month voyage, she came home with 2,400 barrels of whale oil and 10,000 lbs of whalebone, known as baleen, which was worth around USD$56,000.



 American Tall Ship USS Constellation


On 27 March 1794, the United States Congress passed the Naval Act of 1794, which provided for building the US Navy its first new ships: the frigates Chesapeake, Congress, Constellation, Constitution, President, and United States. Constellation was the first to be commissioned. Constellation was built at Harris Creek Shipyard in Baltimore’s Fells Point and launched on 7 September 1797, just as the United States entered the Quasi-War with France. On 9 February 1799, under the command of Captain Thomas Truxtun, Constellation fought and captured the frigate L’Insurgente of 36 guns, the fastest ship in the French Navy — the first major victory by an American-designed and built warship. In February 1800 Constellation fought a night encounter with the frigate La Vengeance of 54 guns. Constellation was victorious after a five-hour battle. The French commander just managed to save his ship from capture and -upon returning to port- was so humiliated he later boasted that the American ship he had fought was a much larger and more powerful ship of the line. Since the encounter, the Constellations incredible speed and power inspired the French to nickname her the "Yankee Racehorse”.

 1797 USS Constitution Old Ironsides Model Ship

The U.S.S. Constitution, a three-mast frigate, is the world’s oldest commissioned warship. Built primarily with dense southern live oak, its hull was 21 inches thick in an era when 18 inches was common. Paul Revere forged the copper spikes and bolts that held the planks in place. The 204-foot-long ship was first put to sea in 1798 and its most famous era of naval warfare was the War of 1812 against Britain, when it captured numerous merchant ships and defeated five warships, including the H.M.S. Guerriere. It was during the ferocious battle with the Guerriere that British seamen, astonished at how their cannonballs were bouncing off the Constitution’s hull, cried out, "Sir, Her sides are made from Iron!" Hence, the nickname, "Old Ironsides." The Constitution today is a national landmark and is currently docked in Boston.

  HMS Endeavour Tall Ship Model


    In 1768 Lieutenant James Cook, Royal Navy, set sail on HMS Endeavour on a voyage of exploration and scientific investigation and through his journeys, Cook is considered to be one of the greatest explorers. In 1770 Cook reached New Zealand where he circumnavigated and completely charted the north and south islands before continuing west. In April, he sighted the east coast of Australia and sailed north along the coast before anchoring in what he named Botany Bay. He then continued north to Cape York and on to Jakarta and Indonesia.
During the four months voyage along the coast Cook charted the coastline from Victoria to Queensland and proclaimed the eastern part of the continent for Great Britain. Cook was the first person to accurately chart a substantial part of the coastline of Australia and to fix the continent in relation to known waters. His explorations of Australia were followed up within a few years by a British expedition to settle the 'new' continent.
    Accordingly, Cook is considered a major figure in Australia's modern history. Numerous places in Australia, particularly on the east Australian coast and New Zealand, have been named after him or his vessel, and many of the names he gave to parts of the Australian east coast in 1770 are still used (e.g. Cape Tribulation, Botany Bay, the Whitsunday's). Cooks 1768-1771 voyages in HMS Endeavour is also considered to be of general historical importance because of its great contributions to the worlds knowledge of seamanship and navigation, as well as geography. On his voyages Cook became the first captain to calculate his longitudinal position with accuracy, using a complex mathematical formula developed in the 1760s. He was also the first to substantially reduce scurvy among his crew, a serious, sometimes fatal result of dietary deficiency on long voyages.

 HMS Victory Tall Ship Model


 HMS Victory was launched in 1765 and is most famous as Adm. Horatio Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Nelson was shot and killed during the battle. H.M.S. Victory is the oldest naval ship still in commission. It has been restored and rests in dry docks at Portsmouth, England. The ship in Portsmouth is the sixth ship with the name Victory in the Royal Navy. There has been great interest in the fifth Victory ship, which was built 15 years earlier and whose wreckage was found recently by Odyssey Marine Exploration.

 Columbia Sailboat Model


Columbia was the defender of the tenth America's Cup race in 1899 against British challenger Shamrock as well as the defender of the eleventh America's Cup race in 1901 against British challenger, Shamrock II. It was the first vessel to win the trophy twice in a row (a record not equalled until Intrepids back-to-back wins in 1967 and 1970.) 
Design
Columbia, a fin keel sloop, was designed and built in 1898-9 by Nathanael Herreshoff and the Herreshoff Manufacturing Company for owners J. Pierpont Morgan and Edwin D. Morgan of the New York Yacht Club. It was the third winning defender built by Herreshoff.
Columbia had a nickel steel frame, a tobin bronze hull, and a steel mast (later replaced with one of Oregon pine.)

 Schooner Atlantic


Commissioned by New York Yacht Club member Wilson Marshall, the Atlantic was launched in 1903. William Gardner, one of America's foremost designers of large yachts, designed her. From the moment Atlantic went to sea, it was clear that she was an exceptionally fast and beautiful schooner. When a yacht in 1903 hits twenty knots during her sea trials, she is a promising yacht, but even then nobody could imagine two years later this yacht would set a record that would stand unmatched for almost a century.


Scale Model of Lord Nelson’s Flagship HMS VictoryContemporary sculptor Ian G Brennan via  victorysculpture

This scale model of Lord Nelson’s Flagship HMS Victory has been carved entirely from centuries old oak timbers removed from HMS Victory during the ships restoration program and is currently on exhibition in Chatham historic dockyards in Kent where HMS Victory was built exactly 250 years ago. Every part of this Victory replica including the hull, sails, ropes and rigging have all been individually carved from solid pieces of original ‘Victory timber.' including the signal flags displaying Admiral Nelson’s famous signal ‘England expects every man to do his duty’. 


Baltimore Clipper source 
 Baltimore Clipper Harvey Wooden Model Boat Replica

1800's Baltimore Clipper Harvey Wooden Model Ship 








Tall Ship Sailing in the Storm via 7seasvessels